Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Fall Festival of Picture Books

October is my favorite time of the year, so I thought it would be fun to share my spooktacular collection of Halloween picture books. I'll be posting more when this year's book order arrives. Enjoy!

This first picture book was a birthday gift from my daughter:



















It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown by Charles M. Schulz

Join the PEANUTS gang as they get ready for a night of trick-or-treating, bobbing for apples, and pumpkin patches. In this faithful adaptation of It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, young readers are introduced to the classic tale in a deluxe Peanuts format—this hardcover edition which makes a stunning addition to any PEANUTS collection.

Note: She also gave me the Charlie Brown plush and Hungry Caterpillar tote!♥

I paired this next one with a Count Von Count plush:

















Vunce Upon a Time by J.otto Seibold and Siobhan Vivian
Illustrations by J.otto Seibold

Dagmar is not like other vampires. He's shy, he's afraid of humans, and . . . he's a vegetarian! But even more than he likes vegetables, Dagmar loves candy. And when he hears about all the treats he can get on Halloween, he knows he has to be brave and venture out into the human world.

Check out the book trailer:



I could watch this video a hundred times. Awesome!





















The Spooky Wheels on the Bus by J. Elizabeth Mills
Illustrations by Ben Mantle

The Spooky Wheels on the Bus is a humorous Halloween-themed version of the classic song "The Wheels on the Bus"...with a few ghoulish tricks and treats up its sleeves! Count from One Spooky Bus up to Ten Goofy Ghosts as this Halloween ride races through town picking up a few unsuspecting passengers along the way.


Next up...





















I’m Not Afraid of this Haunted House by Laurie Friedman
Illustrations by Teresa Murfin

It’s Halloween, and Simon Lester Henry Strauss and his friends make their way through a haunted house filled with creepy creatures. Although his friends are running scared at every turn, brave Simon Lester is not afraid of anything. He handles the Vampire’s Feast, a one-eyed monster, and the Treacherous Tower with tremendous bravado. That is, until he finds himself taken by surprise.




















Zombie in Love by Kelly DiPucchio
Illustrations by Scott Campbell

Mortimer is looking for love. And he’s looking everywhere! He’s worked out at the gym (if only his arm wouldn’t keep falling off). He’s tried ballroom dancing lessons (but the ladies found him to be a bit stiff). He’s even been on stalemate.com. How’s a guy supposed to find a ghoul? When it seems all hope has died, could the girl of Mortimer’s dreams be just one horrifying shriek away?

(This is a very funny book!)






















Even Monsters Need Haircuts by Matthew McElligott

Once a month, when the full moon rises, it's time for the young son of a barber to get to work. His customers are mostly regulars, but they are a very unusual bunch. He'll need more than just scissors to tackle the monstrous task ahead–some rotting tonic, horn polish, and stink wax should do the trick. Being a midnight barber isn't easy, but even monsters need haircuts.




LOL!






















Frankenstein by Rick Walton
Illustrations by Nathan Hale

This laugh-out-loud funny and devilish send-up of Ludwig Bemelmans's Madeline is for little monsters everywhere.

Frankenstein is the scariest of all the monsters in Miss Devel's castle. He can frighten anything--animals, parents, even rocks. Until one night, Miss Devel wakes up and runs downstairs to find that Frankenstein has lost his head!

Click on this link to read a previous post:

http://kimberlylynn1020.blogspot.com/2011/11/monstrous-parody.html

And check out the book trailer:




Next up...





















A Vampire Is Coming to Dinner! Written by Pamela Jane
Illustrations by Pedro Rodriguez

Read along as the narrator of this story comes up with some very practical rules for dealing with a vampire. But rules are meant to be broken, aren’t they?

Click on this link to read a previous post:

http://kimberlylynn1020.blogspot.com/2010/08/reminder.html


And if you're not feeling up to par lately:

















I Feel Better with a Frog in My Throat:
History's Strangest Cures by Carlyn Beccia

It wasn’t too long ago that people tried all sorts of things to help sick people feel better. They tried wild things like drinking a glass full of millipedes or putting some mustard on one's head. Some of the cures worked, and some of them…well, let’s just say that millipedes, living or dead, are not meant to be ingested.

Carlyn Beccia takes readers on a colorful and funny medical mystery tour to discover that while times may have changed, many of today’s most reliable cure-alls have their roots in some very peculiar practices, and so relevant connections can be drawn from what they did then to what we do now.

(Lots of interesting facts for kids to explore!)


















Monster Mash by David Catrow

The "Monster Mash" gets Wolf Man, zombies, and other monsters to dance and party in this catchy, classic song. Dracula rises out of his coffin, vampires feast in the master bedroom, and the ghouls get a jolt from Boris's electrodes.

This "graveyard smash" caught on in a flash, and it became the hit of the land. The song, written in 1962 by Bobby "Boris" Pickett and Lenny Capizzi, has gone on to sell over 4 million copies. Fifty years later, David Catrow takes it to new heights as a picture book, with his fun and wacky illustrations that are sure to get kids singing and "mashing" along.

Click here to read a previous post:

http://kimberlylynn1020.blogspot.com/2012/04/graveyard-smash.html





















Mostly Monsterly by Tammi Sauer
Illustrations by Scott Magoon

Bernadette might seem like an ordinary monster, but sometimes she likes to do some very unmonsterlike things, like pick flowers. And pet kittens. And bake.

When the time comes for Bernadette to go to Monster Academy, she's just a teensy bit nervous. Her classmates just don't understand her. They'd rather uproot trees than sing friendship songs. And they prefer fried snail goo to Bernadette's homemade cupcakes with sprinkles. Can Bernadette find a way to make friends at school and still be herself?

And check out the book trailer:



LOL!


















The 13 Nights of Halloween by Guy Vasilovich

On the first night of Halloween, what does your mummy give you? A bright, shiny Skeleton Key, of course!

In fact, for each of the thirteen nights leading up to the big night, your mummy is ready with gifts that include everything from singing skulls to demons dancing to icky eyeballs. The spookier and slimier, the better!

From debut author-illustrator Guy Vasilovich comes a picture book that is sure to inspire even the youngest readers to start the creepy countdown to Halloween. Sing along to the tune of “The Twelve Days of Christmas” as you get ready for the scariest—and silliest—night of the year.

















Just A Minute by Yuyi Morales
A Trickster Tale and Counting Book

In this original trickster tale, Senor Calavera arrives unexpectedly at Grandma Beetle's door. He requests that she leave with him right away. "Just a minute," Grandma Beetle tells him. She still has one house to sweep, two pots of tea to boil, three pounds of corn to make into tortillas -- and that's just the start! Using both Spanish and English words to tally the party preparations, Grandma Beetle cleverly delays her trip and spends her birthday with a table full of grandchildren and her surprise guest. This spirited tribute to the rich traditions of Mexican culture is the perfect introduction to counting in both English and Spanish. The vivacious illustrations and universal depiction of a family celebration are sure to be adored by young readers everywhere.

Check out this funny video:




And pictured on the right:
The Halloween Kid by Rhode Montijo

From the illustrator of the Melvin Beederman, SUPERHERO series comes a story about a masked hero and his trusty steed. Together they save Halloween from ruthless toilet paper–tossing mummies and pumpkin-sucking vampires.

No siree, Halloween won’t be canceled anytime soon, not while the Halloween Kid’s around. With a rootin’ tootin’ Halloween monster–shootin’ text and retro-modern illustrations, The Halloween Kid will lasso in readers both young and old. Because who doesn’t love a hero who defends the right to trick or treat? Yee-Ha-lloween!



















Over in the Hollow by Rebecca Dickinson
Illustrations by S. Britt

Over in the hollow, where the cobwebs are spun,
Live a giant mother spider and her little spidey one.

Who else lives over in the hollow? A papa mummy and his little mummies two, a mama owl and her little owlets three...and more! And they all have something to say, whether it's to hoot, to howl, to hiss, or to yowl. Inspired by Olive A. Wadsworth's classic counting rhyme, "Over in the Meadow," Over in the Hollow is a spooky take on the popular Appalachian poem. A wonderful read-aloud, the playful rhyme and repetition will delight readers of all ages who enjoy a funnot scaryapproach to the world of ghosts, werewolves, and the like.

















Pictured on the left:

Frank Was a Monster Who Wanted to Dance by Keith Graves

Frank was a monster who wanted to dance. So he put on his hat, and his shoes made in France... and opened a jar and put ants in his pants! So begins this monstrously funny, deliciously disgusting, horrifyingly hilarious story of a monster who follows his dream. Keith Graves' wacky illustrations and laugh-out-loud text will tickle the funny bone and leave readers clamoring for an encore.

And pictured on the right:

Thirteen O’Clock by James Stimson

This is the story of a very normal girl on an almost normal night in a fairly normal housenormal, that is, except for a not-so-normal clock whose numbers count not twelve but a spooky thirteen.
James Stimson's extraordinary book about the antics of a perky prankster in pajamas is a feast of words and pictures. Filled with sly wordplay, atmospheric illustrations, and a baker's dozen of spritely, spooky, spunky characters, it reminds readers that more fun than fright can be had from things that go bump, bong, groan, clatter, squeak, and gong in the night.


Next up...

















Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich by Adam Rex

Being a monster isn't all frightening villagers and sucking blood. Monsters have their trials, too. Poor Frankenstein's cupboard is bare, Wolfman is in need of some household help, and it's best not to get started on Dracula’s hygiene issues. What could be scarier?

Nineteen hilarious poems delve into the secret lives of the Creature from the Black Lagoon, Bigfoot, Godzilla, and others. In a range of styles that pay homage to everyone from Charles Schulz to John James Audubon, the monstrously talented Adam Rex uncovers horrific--and clever--truths you won't want to miss.




















Little Goblins Ten by Pamela Jane
Illustrations by Jane Manning

Over in the forest
Where the trees hide the sun
Lived a big mommy monster
And her little monster one.
"Scare!" said the mommy;
"I scare," said the one.
So he scared and he scampered
Where the trees hide the sun.

From monsters to ghosties to goblins, everyone's favorite beasties haunt and howl and rattle their way through their forest home in this silly, spooky twist on the beloved nursery rhyme "Over in the Meadow."

(Another great read-aloud!)






















Sally and the Some-Thing by George O’Connor

Stuck at home with her mom and her new sibling, Sally heads for the swamp with her fishing pole and bike. What she discovers, in the form of a slimy, slithery Some-Thing, is a new best friend. Mud pies, burping contests, snail racing--and sensational, eerily beautiful artwork deliver plenty of kid appeal.





















I Need My Monster by Amanda Noll
Illustrations by Howard McWilliam

A unique monster-under-the-bed story with the perfect balance of giggles and shivers, this picture book relies on the power of humor over fear, appeals to a child’s love for creatures both alarming and absurd, and glorifies the scope of a child’s imagination. One night, when Ethan checks under his bed for his monster, Gabe, he finds a note from him instead: "Gone fishing. Back in a week." Ethan knows that without Gabe’s familiar nightly scares he doesn't stand a chance of getting to sleep, so Ethan interviews potential substitutes to see if they've got the right equipment for the job—pointy teeth, sharp claws, and a long tail—but none of them proves scary enough for Ethan. When Gabe returns sooner than expected from his fishing trip, Ethan is thrilled. It turns out that Gabe didn't enjoy fishing because the fish scared too easily.























Monster Town by Ryan Heshka

As soon as the sun sets on Monstertown, creatures of all kinds go to work. So hop on the Ghoul Bus and see for yourself who inhabits this ghoulish town. Dr. Cyclops, Postmaster Skeleton, Frank N. Stein, Dr. Mummy, Captain Witch, and many other monster friends—including a junior monster-in-training—will welcome you with open arms!


And this was a birthday present from my daughter last year:

















Creepy Carrots! by Aaron Reynolds
Illustrations by Peter Brown

The Twilight Zone comes to the carrot patch in this clever picture book parable about a rabbit who fears his favorite treats are out to get him.

Jasper Rabbit loves carrots—especially Crackenhopper Field carrots. He eats them on the way to school. He eats them going to Little League. He eats them walking home. Until the day the carrots start following him…or are they? It’s all fun and games . . . until you get too greedy.

And check out the "creepy" video:




And pictured on the right:

The Monsters’ Monster by Patrick McDonnel

Once upon a time, there were three little rascals who thought they were the BIGGEST, BADDEST monsters around. But when they decide to build a huge monster of their own, he isn't exactly what the creatures were expecting. He's happy. He giggles. He's just grateful to be alive. And he has a lesson for his grouchy creators that only takes two little words.

In this playful tale from bestselling picture book author Patrick McDonnell, a very BIG monster shows three very BAD little monsters the power of boundless gratitude.

(Click here to download free activities for this book.)






















Bad Luck Boswell by Diane Dawson Hearn

Are black cats bad luck? Anyone who comes across Bad Luck Boswell will tell you that they are. Wherever this little black cat goes, disaster follows. But when a wicked witch moves to town, Boswell's bad finally comes in handy. He foils her evil scheme and turns from jinx to hero in this delightful tale that makes a perfect Halloween read-aloud.





















Pictured on the left:

Miss Smith and the Haunted Library by Michael Garland

When Miss Smith reads from her magical book, the worlds she describes come alive - literally! Today Miss Smith is taking her class on a field trip to a deliciously spooky library. There the class meets librarian Virginia Creeper and settles down to listen to a few scary tales. Before long everyone's favorite creepy characters are stalking the library and a haunted party is in full swing. So . . . who's for taking a ride with the Headless Horseman? This richly illustrated, colorfully designed story captures the thrill of letting imagination run wild.

Click on this link to read about a real haunted library:

http://kimberlylynn1020.blogspot.com/2009/08/haunted-libraries.html


And pictured on the right:

The Spider and the Fly by Tony DiTerlizzi

"'Will you walk into my parlor,' said the Spider to the Fly..." is easily one of the most recognized and quoted first lines in all of English verse. But do you have any idea how the age-old tale of the Spider and the Fly ends? Join celebrated artist Tony DiTerlizzi as he -- drawing inspiration from one of his loves, the classic Hollywood horror movies of the 1920s and 1930s -- shines a cinematic spotlight on Mary Howitt's warning, written to her own children about those who use sweet words to hide their not-so-sweet intentions.





And let's not forget about Halloween bedtime stories:




















Picture on the left:

Goodnight Goon:  A Petrifying Parody by Michael Rex

It's time for bed, but one little goon still isn't ready for sleep! With lively rhymes and cheeky art that'll get readers howling, this hilarious take on the beloved classic will have a whole new audience saying, "Goodnight monsters everywhere!"


And pictured on the right:

Hush, Little Monster by Denis Markell
Illustrations by Melissa Iwai

A classic lullaby gets a playfully spooky spin in this monstrously sweet picture book.

Hush, Little Monster, don’t you howl.
Daddy’s gonna give you a…screeching owl.
If that owl won’t say “whoo whoo”…
Granny Ghost will bring you a big, bad boo!

A monster father softly sings his own version of a favorite lullaby to his son. A screeching owl, a vampire, an ogre, and zombies are just a few of the creatures who will come to soothe Little Monster through the night, until (when the sun comes up) it’s finally time for him to go to sleep. Parents and children alike will love this humorous twist on “Hush, Little Baby.”


Are you oozing with excitement yet?  I'll be sharing more Halloween goodies next week. Just wait until you see what I picked up for my grandson.  Stay tuned!

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